Natural Sources of C?

What is vitamin C? Is there such a thing as a vitamin C complex? Why do so many people now believe in the complex?

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chimp
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Natural Sources of C?

Post Number:#1  Post by chimp » Wed Jul 05, 2006 9:14 pm

I am searching for natural sources of vitamin C, just in case of the collapse of civilization as we know it :wink:

Pine needles appear to be one source, interesting :D

http://www.vitamincity.com/herbs/pine.htm

In 1534, when the French explorer Jacques Cartier landed at the Saint Lawrence River, many of his crew had died of scurvy. Native Americans saved the survivors with a tea made from Pine needles, which contains vitamin C. The genus name is from Latin.

J.Lilinoe

natural sources of VC

Post Number:#2  Post by J.Lilinoe » Wed Jul 05, 2006 10:46 pm

Probably a good source to start with would be our indigenous Native American people who are full of wisdom in these areas, obviously. Good luck with your search.

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Post Number:#3  Post by chimp » Wed Jul 05, 2006 10:58 pm

http://www.zetatalk.com/mexico/theal05u.htm

Pine may just be a popular Christmas tree to you, but to Indians, pioneers, mountain men and hikers, the tree has been a source of nutrition, medicine and at times a lifesaver. All pines share basically the same medicinal qualities. However the main medicinal varieties are scotch pine and white pine. The parts of the tree that are highly medicinal are the needles, inner bark and sap. Pine needle tea is high in vitamins A and C. In fact the fresh green needles have five times the amount of vitamin C found in one lemon. Throughout the centuries, people have literally survived on pine-needle tea as well as cured themselves of scurvy by drinking a tea of both the needles and inner bark of the pine tree.



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usda database

Post Number:#4  Post by ofonorow » Thu Jul 06, 2006 8:00 am

Our (rather large) html database is from the USDA and is sorted by the vitamin c content of the food. http://www.vitamincfoundation.org/usda.html

Be careful as this file can bust some browsers/PCs which run out of memory!
Owen R. Fonorow, Orthopath (Orthomolecular Naturopath)
Love thru suffering

Van Carman
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Primates And Raw Food

Post Number:#5  Post by Van Carman » Thu Jul 06, 2006 3:36 pm

Dont forget the primates that do not cook their food seemingly get along fine,even without the gulonolactone oxidase enzyme.Maybe we should learn from them,to eat at least all our vegetables and fruits raw,getting all the needed enzymes plus the ascorbic acid.I know others will have good information on this subject.Sincerely,Van
cinnamon and scurvy

Clark DeBona

Sumac and C

Post Number:#6  Post by Clark DeBona » Sat Jul 08, 2006 6:14 am

This is always a good topic to be well informed about. You never know when we may all need these skills. I have a friend who is native american from Vermont and I asked him about this. He said around here they used Sumac. I wonder if Sumac has ever been tested.
When I told him about pine nedles his face turned sour as he said pine tasts bad.

Another great sourse of information regarding natural living would be the Amish. They have been doing it forever. Only problem is that once the power goes out, people will panic and over run thier farms for food and shelter and we may end up draging them down too.

Clark

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Pennywort Plant

Post Number:#7  Post by Van Carman » Sat Jul 08, 2006 4:53 pm

Here is a real good provider of ascorbic acid plus antioxidants.Also known as gotu kola.It grows as a weed in California and other southern states.Sincerely,Van
cinnamon and scurvy

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Post Number:#8  Post by chimp » Sat Jul 08, 2006 9:55 pm

:o :o :o

A warning about pine needles:

http://www.iastate.edu/IaStater/1997/sept/pine.html

Hungry cows in the West often turn to Ponderosa pine trees for their next meal, and many pregnant cows that eat pine needles give birth prematurely and the calves die. For years, researchers have been trying to figure out why.

That's where ISU animal science professor Stephen Ford entered the picture, collaborating with ISU graduate student Lane Christenson; University of Iowa's John Rosazza, Donna Farley and Mohsen Al-Mahmoud; and Robert Short, at a U.S. Department of Agriculture cattle research center in Montana.

The UI researchers did chemical extractions on the Montana pine needles, isolating various compounds for testing, and Ford and Christenson analyzed the compounds. Once a compound that was a potential culprit was found, batches were fed to late-pregnant guinea pigs and Montana cattle.

This cooperative effort led to the discovery of a set of compounds that slows blood flow to the cow's uterus, and thus oxygen and nutrients to the calf, and results in births three to four weeks early.

Ford said both fresh and dry pine needles contain fatty compounds that cause arteries and blood vessels to constrict. The discovery of this unique class of fats earned a patent for the six researchers earlier this year. Now they're working to find an antidote or a way to help cows digest these compounds without problems.


Weeds of Wonder:

http://www.angelfire.com/biz6/Psyteric/weeds.html

Dandelion - Eat the washed raw leaves in salads, or drink dandelion coffee. It is ideal for drinkers of alcohol, as it replenishes the liver with vitamin A, which alcohol depletes at a rapid rate. It also contains vitamins BI, B2, and C. The leaves contain iron, zinc, and copper, as well as sodium, magnesium and are very rich in calcium. It is a great all-rounder for the body and its functions in general. Dandelion coffee contains a type of lecithin, called choline, which breaks down fat in the foods you eat. This makes it ideal for people who don't want to starve while on a diet too! When the dandelion is in full bloom, the sap from the stem should be placed onto warts every day for about one week, it gets rid of them without chemicals.

[...]

Elder - The flowers can be fried in batter to eat with custard as a sweet. The berries are rich in vitamin C, and are good as a wine to prevent and cure colds. The berries can make you violently sick if too many are eaten, but a few can be added to apple pies, apple and elderberry jam or sweet dishes. They are more palatable to humans when cooked. Leave enough for the birds as it is a good diet for them, and often-selfish wine makers strip these bushes bare. Elder flowers steeped in vinegar make an excellent gargle for a soar throat.


Nettle - This can be made into nettle soup, tea, or boiled like a vegetable. It is said to cure rheumatism and hypertension. Stew slowly the young tips of the nettle, strain and bottle the juice. Take one glassful a day as a tonic or cure. Nettles are rich in vitamin C, and rich in iron, they can help cure and prevent spots. When old nettles are boiled, the strained liquid can be sprayed onto plants, to help rid them of unwanted green and black fly. The fibrous leaves were used at one time to make paper and materials.






zucic

Re: Natural Sources of C?

Post Number:#9  Post by zucic » Tue Jul 11, 2006 3:16 am

chimp wrote:I am searching for natural sources of vitamin C,
just in case of the collapse of civilization as we know it.

An overregulated civilization may have the same effect,
just by criminalizing high doses of vitamins.

chimp wrote:Pine needles appear to be one source, interesting.

This is a sort of backup in cold continenal climate, far north.
In moderate zone, fresh seasonal fruits are much better solution.
Rosehips may be found in November, even December (Europe).
I have done some unformal research couple of months ago,
by talking with old people from some (submediterranean) villages
in Bosnia & Herzegowina and southern parts of Croatia.
Fruits were consumed whenever available. Green leafy vegetables
were of paramount importance in the past, especially as winter
backup (shortage of fruits). The most important was wild cabbage
(Brassica oleracea), but raw stems from flowering plants were given
to children. Raw wild plants were consumed starting
somewhere in March. February was a hard time. Fermented
cabbage ("Sauerkraut") is excellent winter source of vitamin C.

zucic

Re: Natural Sources of C?

Post Number:#10  Post by zucic » Tue Jul 11, 2006 3:35 am

zucic wrote:Fermented cabbage ("Sauerkraut") is excellent
winter source of vitamin C.


... and of course nuts and lemons - these may be stored too.

hyperascorbemic

Post Number:#11  Post by hyperascorbemic » Tue Jul 11, 2006 7:21 pm

Don't forget raw animal adrenal glands . Mmm...

NaturopathMan

Re: Natural Sources of C?

Post Number:#12  Post by NaturopathMan » Sat Feb 03, 2007 5:22 am

chimp wrote:I am searching for natural sources of vitamin C, just in case of the collapse of civilization as we know it :wink:

Pine needles appear to be one source, interesting :D

http://www.vitamincity.com/herbs/pine.htm

In 1534, when the French explorer Jacques Cartier landed at the Saint Lawrence River, many of his crew had died of scurvy. Native Americans saved the survivors with a tea made from Pine needles, which contains vitamin C. The genus name is from Latin.


Here's some very high natural vitamin C sources. Camu Camu berries, Amla herb(Ayuverdic) Adrenal glandulars, acerola, rose hips
Radiance C is a whole food Vitamin C supplement http://www.synergy-co.com/pages/pure-radiance.html
Here's another Natural C product. It's a powder, actually tastes good with a smoothie http://www.healthforce.com/vitamin-c.htm


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